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Does Your Student Have a High School and Beyond Plan?

High School Students at GraduationPost-secondary education planning is not just for high school upperclassmen.  The Washington State Board of Education recommends a student create their required High School and Beyond Plan (HSBP) in the eighth grade and continue to revise it throughout high school.

A well designed HSBP will help a student explore career options aligned with interests and skills.  The plan then helps the student structure their high school coarse load and extracurricular activities so he or she can achieve their desired future.

The High School and Beyond Plan is a formal process outlined by the Washington State Board of Education.  The Washington State Board of Education provides tools and guides to help students explore their interests and skills.

However, each school district determines how they will implement a High School and Beyond program so the quality of plans vary widely across the state.  As a parent, you are critical member of your student’s planning team.

At a minimum, a HSBP should have:

  • An educational goal
  • A four-year course plan for high school
  • Identification of required assessments

If your child is in eighth grade or older and you have not participated in creating his/her HSBP, contact the guidance counselor at your child’s school.

For more information on the Washington State High School and Beyond Program, reference the Washington State Board of Education website:

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Autism vs. Awesome-ism©
By Dr. Melodee Loshbaugh, Co-founder & Executive Director of Brock’s Academy, Woodinville, WA

>What if we decided to just open our minds and see things from a wider, more diverse perspective?

>What if we didn't easily label and categorize people that we perceive to be different than us?

>What if we learned to think about people and differences as not right or wrong, but just different gifts?

>What if we fully believed and accepted that there is, and always has been, neurodiversity (i.e. cognitive differences) in the world?

>What if we accepted that neurodiversity is a brilliant achievement of Mother Nature?

>What if we entered each day believing each one of us is uniquely created and here to serve a higher purpose?

>What if we believed our job is to support one another in achieving that higher purpose?

>What if our differences are here to teach us appreciation, compassion, acceptance and to challenge us to stay open to all?

>What would that be like? # # #

Ryan, a 14-year old autistic student, writes:
>Meet me where I am.
>Stop trying to fix me. I don’t try to fix you.
>See my gifts, talents and strengths, not things you think I should have; see the “me” I was born with.
>Learn from me. Sit with me. Try to see the world from my perspective.
>Love me unconditionally and find ways to support me in what I came here to contribute to the world.
>Appreciate me.
>Just because I am experiencing the world in a different way than you are doesn’t mean it’s wrong, so stop judging me.
>I am me and I am beautiful.
>I am happy and I am whole. # # #

Copyright 2017—Dr. Melodee Loshbaugh
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