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The Good and The Bad of Video Games

So your child has finished their homework, organized their notes and studied for their upcoming test next week. If you’re child is like 91% of other children in the US, you probably know what they’ll do next. Play video games!

Girl_plays_Pac_Man While there has been a lot of concern over the effects of video games on children’s minds and behavior, new research shows that perhaps video games can be beneficial. A new study from the University of Oxford shows that children between the ages of 10-15 who played an hour or less of video games a day were better equipped psychologically for social interactions with friends and family than children who didn’t play any video games at all. While it could be that children with good self-control or with a parent limiting their time spent playing video games is what’s also improving the child’s social behavior, the study suggests that video games may also help. It could be that as video games have evolved to become more of a social activity children are learning skills for social interaction through them. However, the study also found that children who played more than 3 hours of video games a day were less skilled at interacting socially.

The next time your child can’t wait to finish their homework and jump into Destiny or their Minecraft world, don’t feel too worried. Rewarding kids for work is a good thing, and playing video games might be good too, as long as it’s in moderation.

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Autism vs. Awesome-ism©
By Dr. Melodee Loshbaugh, Co-founder & Executive Director of Brock’s Academy, Woodinville, WA

>What if we decided to just open our minds and see things from a wider, more diverse perspective?

>What if we didn't easily label and categorize people that we perceive to be different than us?

>What if we learned to think about people and differences as not right or wrong, but just different gifts?

>What if we fully believed and accepted that there is, and always has been, neurodiversity (i.e. cognitive differences) in the world?

>What if we accepted that neurodiversity is a brilliant achievement of Mother Nature?

>What if we entered each day believing each one of us is uniquely created and here to serve a higher purpose?

>What if we believed our job is to support one another in achieving that higher purpose?

>What if our differences are here to teach us appreciation, compassion, acceptance and to challenge us to stay open to all?

>What would that be like? # # #

Ryan, a 14-year old autistic student, writes:
>Meet me where I am.
>Stop trying to fix me. I don’t try to fix you.
>See my gifts, talents and strengths, not things you think I should have; see the “me” I was born with.
>Learn from me. Sit with me. Try to see the world from my perspective.
>Love me unconditionally and find ways to support me in what I came here to contribute to the world.
>Appreciate me.
>Just because I am experiencing the world in a different way than you are doesn’t mean it’s wrong, so stop judging me.
>I am me and I am beautiful.
>I am happy and I am whole. # # #

Copyright 2017—Dr. Melodee Loshbaugh
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