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Doodling Helps Improve Writing Skills

Does your child doodle in class?  Do you sometimes get emails home from teachers saying your child was not paying attention and complain they were doodling?  Research shows doodling can actually be beneficial for a child.  Doodling opens up neural pathways in the brain that can actually result in a higher level of concentration.

Doodle ShapesDoodling and drawing can also help a child with their writing.  According to Misty Adoniou, a senior lecturer in literacy and teaching English as a second language at the University of Canberra, in Australia, “Children who draw before they tackle writing tasks produce better writing–it’s longer, more syntactically sophisticated and has a greater variety of vocabulary. It is likely this is because the act of drawing concentrates the mind on the topic at hand, and provides an avenue for rehearsal before writing–rather like a first draft where they can sort things out before having to commit words to a page.”

It is hard for children to stay focused all the time and doodling allows for their mind to release stress, which in turn opens their minds.  Doodling can also help a restless child keep calm and focus.  Doodling is beneficial and even necessary, according to Sunni Brown, the author of “The Doodle Revolution.”

“There is no such thing as a mindless doodle”
~Sunni Brown.

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Autism vs. Awesome-ism©
By Dr. Melodee Loshbaugh, Co-founder & Executive Director of Brock’s Academy, Woodinville, WA

>What if we decided to just open our minds and see things from a wider, more diverse perspective?

>What if we didn't easily label and categorize people that we perceive to be different than us?

>What if we learned to think about people and differences as not right or wrong, but just different gifts?

>What if we fully believed and accepted that there is, and always has been, neurodiversity (i.e. cognitive differences) in the world?

>What if we accepted that neurodiversity is a brilliant achievement of Mother Nature?

>What if we entered each day believing each one of us is uniquely created and here to serve a higher purpose?

>What if we believed our job is to support one another in achieving that higher purpose?

>What if our differences are here to teach us appreciation, compassion, acceptance and to challenge us to stay open to all?

>What would that be like? # # #

Ryan, a 14-year old autistic student, writes:
>Meet me where I am.
>Stop trying to fix me. I don’t try to fix you.
>See my gifts, talents and strengths, not things you think I should have; see the “me” I was born with.
>Learn from me. Sit with me. Try to see the world from my perspective.
>Love me unconditionally and find ways to support me in what I came here to contribute to the world.
>Appreciate me.
>Just because I am experiencing the world in a different way than you are doesn’t mean it’s wrong, so stop judging me.
>I am me and I am beautiful.
>I am happy and I am whole. # # #

Copyright 2017—Dr. Melodee Loshbaugh
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