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Windows of Opportunity with Learning

small ChildOptimal times of learning in children are called “Windows of Opportunity.”  During the first few years of life, a child’s brain begins to wire approximately 100 trillion neurons for social intelligence, emotional intelligence, motor development, vision and thinking skills. Motor development and vision primarily develop between the ages 2 and puberty.  Social and emotional intelligence and thinking skills become heightened between the ages 4 and puberty.

Vocabulary develops between the ages of 0 and 24 months, however, skills become refined between 2 and 7 years.  Two reliable indicators for reading success are the size of one’s vocabulary and sound discrimination.

As children grow older (between ages 10 and 25) their brains begin to go into a slow maturation process and won’t be fully developed until age 25.  Some children who’s brains may be delayed in some of areas of development, such as social skills, may struggle in school.

The early development stages of children’s brains are windows of opportunity for learning.  If a child is struggling to learn in school, parents and educators need to support them with additional help, or the window of opportunity to learn that subject may be missed.

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Autism vs. Awesome-ism©
By Dr. Melodee Loshbaugh, Co-founder & Executive Director of Brock’s Academy, Woodinville, WA

>What if we decided to just open our minds and see things from a wider, more diverse perspective?

>What if we didn't easily label and categorize people that we perceive to be different than us?

>What if we learned to think about people and differences as not right or wrong, but just different gifts?

>What if we fully believed and accepted that there is, and always has been, neurodiversity (i.e. cognitive differences) in the world?

>What if we accepted that neurodiversity is a brilliant achievement of Mother Nature?

>What if we entered each day believing each one of us is uniquely created and here to serve a higher purpose?

>What if we believed our job is to support one another in achieving that higher purpose?

>What if our differences are here to teach us appreciation, compassion, acceptance and to challenge us to stay open to all?

>What would that be like? # # #

Ryan, a 14-year old autistic student, writes:
>Meet me where I am.
>Stop trying to fix me. I don’t try to fix you.
>See my gifts, talents and strengths, not things you think I should have; see the “me” I was born with.
>Learn from me. Sit with me. Try to see the world from my perspective.
>Love me unconditionally and find ways to support me in what I came here to contribute to the world.
>Appreciate me.
>Just because I am experiencing the world in a different way than you are doesn’t mean it’s wrong, so stop judging me.
>I am me and I am beautiful.
>I am happy and I am whole. # # #

Copyright 2017—Dr. Melodee Loshbaugh
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